NINE CIRCLES - TWINKLING STARS

PARIS - TUILERIE’S GARDEN - SUNDAY AFTERNOON

PARIS - TUILERIE’S GARDEN - SUNDAY AFTERNOON

  

OTO - ANYWAY

  

DIETER MOEBIUS - HASENHEIDE

SMITH AND PEARSON
www.smithandpearson.com

SMITH AND PEARSON

www.smithandpearson.com

JUST BACK FROM COMEX - MARSEILLE

JUST BACK FROM COMEX - MARSEILLE

  

THE PIGBROS - EXCESSIVE - THE BLUBBERHOUSES

  

THE WAKE - AN IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - HARMONY

BANKS VIOLETTE
For this new installation, Violette continues to mine a rich art historical terrain in which the materials and forms associated with Minimal and Conceptual Art become reactivated as theatrical platforms of performative decay. He pairs a large chandelier composed of multiple fluorescent tubes with a black wall that seems to buckle and melt against the reflection of the light. Both aspects of the installation recall the monochromatic tone and the use of replaceable industrial materials common to Minimalist and Conceptual sculptors such as Donald Judd and Dan Flavin; however, Violette’s works seem self-consciously constructed and theatrical. Wires fall in a cascade alongside the chandelier while the apparatus of steel tubes and sandbags supporting the wall remain in plain sight. By exposing these more banal technical necessities, Violette heightens the artificial spectacle of his installation, as if willing these two canonical art historical movements into an internecine danse macabre. He unmasks form and content as sites vulnerable to intellectual vandalism and moribund mythologizing.
Gladstone Gallery - New York / Through April 27

BANKS VIOLETTE

For this new installation, Violette continues to mine a rich art historical terrain in which the materials and forms associated with Minimal and Conceptual Art become reactivated as theatrical platforms of performative decay. He pairs a large chandelier composed of multiple fluorescent tubes with a black wall that seems to buckle and melt against the reflection of the light. Both aspects of the installation recall the monochromatic tone and the use of replaceable industrial materials common to Minimalist and Conceptual sculptors such as Donald Judd and Dan Flavin; however, Violette’s works seem self-consciously constructed and theatrical. Wires fall in a cascade alongside the chandelier while the apparatus of steel tubes and sandbags supporting the wall remain in plain sight. By exposing these more banal technical necessities, Violette heightens the artificial spectacle of his installation, as if willing these two canonical art historical movements into an internecine danse macabre. He unmasks form and content as sites vulnerable to intellectual vandalism and moribund mythologizing.

Gladstone Gallery - New York / Through April 27

DENNIS LIN - NO. 1-60
Dennis Lin has collected it, bypassing the mill and has prevented it from being turned into something other than. The Maple has been debarked, sectioned into cookies, sanded, oiled, and waxed: preserved. The 60, three-inch wide slabs are sequentially hung on purpose-built hooks. Each has been numbered and tagged with a brass plate; the tree has been documented and cataloged.
“To see the sections of the tree is to wonder how it grew, how it lived and how it died,” said artist Dennis Lin. “I’ve cataloged this tree out of my own curiosity and to make it accessible for others to question how this organism came into being.”
The use of an anonymous engineering design aesthetic nods to the utilitarian world of material handling. This muted hardware allows the burled patterning, spalting, and birds-eye figuring of the interior to come forward and the anomaly of these interior formations to be made accessible to the viewer. Lin takes on the role of facilitator as he steps back and allows the tree to tell of both its life and death, inspiring discovery and awe, in a way that would not have been possible had it reached the mill.
Forty Seven Gallery - Toronto / Through March 5

DENNIS LIN - NO. 1-60

Dennis Lin has collected it, bypassing the mill and has prevented it from being turned into something other than. The Maple has been debarked, sectioned into cookies, sanded, oiled, and waxed: preserved. The 60, three-inch wide slabs are sequentially hung on purpose-built hooks. Each has been numbered and tagged with a brass plate; the tree has been documented and cataloged.

“To see the sections of the tree is to wonder how it grew, how it lived and how it died,” said artist Dennis Lin. “I’ve cataloged this tree out of my own curiosity and to make it accessible for others to question how this organism came into being.”

The use of an anonymous engineering design aesthetic nods to the utilitarian world of material handling. This muted hardware allows the burled patterning, spalting, and birds-eye figuring of the interior to come forward and the anomaly of these interior formations to be made accessible to the viewer. Lin takes on the role of facilitator as he steps back and allows the tree to tell of both its life and death, inspiring discovery and awe, in a way that would not have been possible had it reached the mill.

Forty Seven Gallery - Toronto / Through March 5